POWER 100: The keys to power - Who are the most influential marketers in the UK? Marketing lists the top 100 by their brands, advertising budgets, industry connections and star quality. (2 of 2)

50. MARTIN GEORGE, BA

50. MARTIN GEORGE, BA



Martin George is a BA stalwart. Apart from a few years at the very

beginning of his career with Cadbury, he has spent his whole career with

the airline.



He began as a brand manager in 1987 and worked his way up to marketing

director ten years later.



He has witnessed and survived the tailfin redesign, the cabin staff

strike and the departure of chief executive Bob Ayling and fellow

marketers Derek Dear and Chris Holt.





51. JIM HYTNER, CHANNEL 5



Channel 5 marketing director Jim Hytner is living proof that when it

comes to effective ad campaigns, size doesn’t matter.



Despite the sort of marketing budget that keeps supermodels in bed,

Hytner has ambushed his better-funded rivals with a series of coups.



This includes a perimeter ad offensive against UEFA matches screened by

the BBC, inviting viewers to switch over and watch a game on C5 being

shown at the same time.



Forty-year-old Hytner’s career spans blue-chip brands such as Coca-Cola,

Sega Europe and BSkyB, where he was also marketing director. His next

job is likely to involve switching titles from marketing to managing

director.



Hytner comes from a family of over-achievers and his brother Richard

runs Publicis.





52. SIMON WAUGH, CENTRICA



Appointed group marketing director at Centrica in 1997 aged 39, Simon

Waugh has driven the company into a more broad-based marketing led

business.



Waugh took his first job, at American Express, as a short-term measure

to finance a trip to see a girlfriend in Paris, but stayed for 14 years

in a wide variety of roles. In 1991 he moved to Lloyd’s Financial

Services as marketing director and subsequently to Saga Services as

managing director.



Charged with rebuilding British Gas’ image in a competitive energy

market, he has stretched the Goldfish loyalty scheme into a financial

service and has also overseen the company’s acquisition of the AA.



Expect to hear Waugh’s name as Centrica moves into more consumer

markets.





53. SHEILA MCKECHNIE, CONSUMERS’ ASSOCIATION



The Consumers’ Association has never been low profile, but in the past

year McKechnie has spearheaded a campaign against ’Rip-off’ prices,

coinciding with the Competition Commission investigation into

supermarket prices.



The CA has also launched car sales online. You do not want her as an

enemy of your brand.





54. ANDREW MARSDEN, BRITVIC



Tango’s reputation for controversial ads was already established when

Marsden arrived as marketing director from HP Foods. But the former

Unilever marketer has continued the strategy, making an otherwise

unremarkable fizzy drink into a cult brand.



A known face on the marketing social scene, Marsden scores highly on the

industry fame factor. He is an ISBA executive committee member.





55. IAN SCHOOLAR, RBS



When the dust settled on Royal Bank of Scotland’s take-over of NatWest,

some pundits were surprised to see Ian Schoolar standing his ground.



Few would have blamed him for leaving during the acrimonious battle, but

his persistence paid off and in March the new Edinburgh paymasters

confirmed him as head of NatWest brand communication.



Questions remain over how much power Schoolar will have and how free a

rein he will be given to develop the brand. It also remains to be seen

if RBS keeps the strings pulled on his budget, which topped thepounds

10m mark last year.





56. DAVID KERSHAW, M&C SAATCHI



Kershaw is one of the original ’Three Amigos’ who left Saatchi & Saatchi

with Maurice and Charles.



Kershaw is one of the best-respected ’suits’ in the business, presiding

over some impressive business wins for M&C over the past few years.



A consummate networker, Kershaw is next year’s president of the select,

men-only Solus Club.





57. WALLY OLINS, WOLFF OLINS



Wally Olins stepped down as chairman of Wolff Olins, the branding and

corporate identity agency that he founded in 1965, three years ago but

still has a holding in the company.



Olins is behind some of the great corporate identities and brand

launches of recent years including First Direct in 1989, the BT ’Piper’

in 1991, and Orange in 1994.



Olins, 69, helped to put corporate identity on the map with his strong

views on design. He has also published several books on design and

travels the world as a lecturer on design management.





58. ANDY JONES, VAUXHALL



Vauxhall is the UK’s second-biggest car advertiser, behind Renault, and

marketing operations director Jones oversees an pounds 84m budget.



Although Vauxhall is a big TV advertiser, Jones is exploring

below-the-line options, including innovative use of telemarketing. He is

an ISBA executive committee member.





59. ANDREW ROBERTSON, ABBOTT MEAD VICKERS



In January, Andrew Robertson became chief executive of Abbott Mead

Vickers BBDO after five years as managing director.



Robertson is one of the key new managers who is gradually taking over

the running of the agency from its founders. He leads one of the UK’s

top creative agencies, which has major clients such as BT, Guinness,

Mars and Pepsi and had billings of pounds 382m last year.



Before joining AMV Robertson became one of the youngest agency chiefs in

the ad world, aged just 30, when he was appointed WCRS chief executive

in 1990.



Robertson sits on the IPA and Advertising Association councils.





60. RUPERT HOWELL, HHCL & PARTNERS



Head of one of the most successful ad agencies of the 90s, president of

the Institute of Practitioners in Advertising and Guardian columnist,

Rupert Howell is one of the marketing industry’s highest-profile

figures.



His presidency of the IPA has started well and he has been a robust

defender of the freedom to advertise.



He began his career at Mathers Advertising in 1979 and moved rapidly up

the ladder with jobs at Grey Advertising and Y&R. In 1987 he left Y&R to

found Howell Henry Chaldecott Lury (later relaunched as HHCL & Partners)

which has done groundbreaking work for brands such as Tango and Egg.



Known for his modesty, How- ell will probably be surprised to find

himself on this list.





61. DAVID BROOK, CHANNEL 4



Despite maintaining a relatively low profile, David Brook is the

marketing brain behind some of the UK’s most successful media

brands.



After nine years as marketing director of The Guardian and Observer, it

was Brook who masterminded the birth of Channel 5, complete with the

’Give Me 5’ retuning campaign and backing by the Spice Girls.



At Channel 4, where he is strategy and development director, he unveiled

Film Four, Channel 4’s contemporary paid-for film channel, which has

300,000 subscribers.



Many see his role in wresting cricket for C4 from the BBC and restoring

its appeal to a broader audience as one of his major achievements.



Brook is now leading the extension of the C4 brand into entertainment

channel E4 and a racing channel.





62. JOHN MCCULLOCH, HSBC



John McCulloch currently holds the biggest marketing job in UK financial

services.



He is head of marketing at Britain’s biggest bank, HSBC, but there is

some speculation about whether he will retain the role. Moved into the

job from number two in April this year, when group marketing director

Mary Jo Jacobi left, McCulloch’s position at the top is described as

temporary by HSBC.



Whatever happens, HSBC is one of the fastest growing banks in the world,

and its senior marketer has a big job.



In the UK, it spent around pounds 10m on ads last year, but expect that

to increase.





63. THIERRY MOREAU, RENAULT UK



A Frenchman joins the list in the shape of Thierry Moreau. He joined

Renault UK as marketing director in 1998, after serving ten years with

the company in France. At the Paris headquarters, he had been executive

secretary of European sales, and before that head of strategic planning

worldwide.



He is responsible for product planning, pricing, vehicle distribution,

market analysis.



Moreau wins his place on this list partly because Renault was the

biggest car advertiser in the UK last year with an pounds 85m spend

Renault recently announced a joint marketing initiative with Nissan.





64. JOHN MENDEL, FORD



John Mendel, Ford’s UK director of marketing, has been in the UK for

just ten months. Last July, he was drafted in from the US to oversee the

ad budget and to boost sales of the Focus model.



His career with the company began in 1976. Before entering the UK as

part of a management shuffle, he was Ford-owned Lincoln Mercury’s

franchise development manager. Before that, he was regional manager of

Ford in Los Angeles.



Mendel is now in charge of an pounds 57m spend, and models which include

the Ka, Puma, Galaxy and Focus.





65. RAOUL PINNELL, SHELL



Heinz, Prudential, NatWest, Shell - Raoul Pinnell’s career reads like a

Who’s Who of big brand names.



It’s probably a lucky thing; Pinnell’s other claim to fame is that he’s

the spitting image of former PM John Major.



He is also known as one of the most religious men in marketing. While

being a strong believer in capitalism and commerce, Pinnell’s Christian

beliefs give him a firm moral position on issues - including being a

fierce critic of the National Lottery.



Elsewhere, this could have been a problem; for Shell it has been a

boon.



The 49-year-old became branding and communications director of Shell

International in 1996 - a year after the damaging Brent Spar oil

platform battle with Greenpeace, and the execution of Nigerian

anti-Shell activist Ken Saro-Wiwa.



Shell’s public reputation is much improved since Pinnell’s arrival. He

is a member of the Institute of Directors.





66. SUE FARR



Sue Farr’s the only jobless person to make it into the Power 100, which

reflects her standing in the industry.



Recent Marketing headlines have reflected the industry’s surprise at the

decision by Greg Dyke to pass her over for the top marketing post in

favour of Matthew Bannister. That signalled her resignation from the BBC

last month. Farr’s career to date reads like a Who’s Who of marketing:

Thames Television corporate communications director; UK Gold marketing

director; and, most recently, director of public service marketing at

the BBC.



Her achievements include the successful launches of UK Gold and Radio 5

Live, the repositioning of Radio 1 and the creation a revamped and

expanded marketing force within the BBC.



Farr is taking a short time out for a break but the question is, where

will she go next?



Likely: agency job. Unlikely: ITV.





67. BILL RONALD, MARS CONFECTIONERY



Typically for a Mars man it’s hard to find much information about Bill

Ronald, The 44-year-old joined Mars straight from college, starting with

the classic graduate job of selling confectionery to independent

retailers from the back of his car. Twenty-two years on and Ronald has

landed the Slough firm’s managing director position. Ronald sits on

ISBA’s council.





68. ALAN PALMER, CADBURY-SCHWEPPES



The former marketing director of Cadbury now heads Cadbury-Schweppes’

pan-European confectionery division. Palmer’s biggest claim to fame is

the pounds 10m Coronation Street sponsorship.



As international marketing director, Palmer recently conducted a pitch

among UK advertising agencies for a European agency.



He is also an ISBA executive committee member.





69. CHRIS POWELL, BMP DDB



Brother to both Tony Blair’s chief of staff, Jonathan Powell, and former

aide to Margaret Thatcher, Charles Powell.



The political leanings of his family have been reflected in his own work

for the Labour Party in the 80s and early 90s.



Now fairly removed from the day-to-day running of the agency he joined

at its birth 30 years ago, Powell is a well respected agency

veteran.





70. LORD BELL, CHIME COMMUNICATIONS



Mrs Thatcher’s favourite PR man is one of the more colourful characters

in PR and as chairman of Chime retains his position of power after three

decades.



His PR agency, Bell Pottinger, has the biggest income of any UK PR

agency, while his purchase of HHCL & Partners in 1998 showed he is far

from heading for retirement.



Tim Bell’s power base is rooted in his star quality and a contacts book

that probably includes most of this list.





71. ELIZABETH FRANCE, DATA PROTECTION REGISTRAR



A career civil servant, France has held the Registrar’s job since

1994.



However, her power over marketers was demonstrated last year, when it

emerged that France’s plans for the new Data Protection Act would make

the use of customer information and bought lists far more difficult.





72. STEVE RUSSELL, BOOTS



The former merchandising director for Boots the Chemist became managing

director of Do It All, then joint managing director of the whole group,

before taking the chief executive’s post in April.



Russell has presided over innovation and diversification for the retail

and pharmaceuticals group, with expansion into Europe and the Far

East.



He also introduced the Boots Advantage Card.



Although Boots has recently lost fans in the City, Russell is seen as a

smart operator.





73. STEPHEN CARTER, J WALTER THOMPSON



Stephen Carter is regarded as a prodigy within advertising circles for

his dizzying climb to power. He joined JWT in 1987 as a graduate trainee

and just ten years later was made chief executive.



Carter is a sharp thinker, with the task of turning JWT from an

’advertising agency’ into a communications agency.





74. DAVID MANSFIELD, CAPITAL RADIO



David Mansfield became heir to Richard Eyre’s pre-ITV throne in

1997.



He has steered Capital Radio through tough times, including a failed

takeover of Virgin Radio, to its position as the UK’s largest commercial

radio group, valued at pounds 1bn.



Mansfield’s mission is to make Capital the top national radio group and

the company is in the process of acquiring Border’s radio interests.



As group chief executive, he is respected in the City and his vision for

keeping Capital a radio-focused company marks out his passion for the

business.



He is a digital-radio advocate and a tough negotiator with a wicked

sense of humour. Mansfield joined Capital Radio in 1993. He is also in

the list because of his extensive media contacts and good relations with

many leading figures in marketing and advertising, to whom he is an old

mate.





75. JEREMY BULLMORE



Jeremy Bullmore should probably be higher up this list. But such is his

modesty, that he’d probably prefer we’d left him off all together.



Bullmore would describe himself as a retired member of this

industry.



Others would argue he’s not retired at all.



He is a non-executive director of WPP and the Guardian Media Group, and

is the president of NABS. He remains one of the most influential,

erudite, and sharply intelligent voices in the industry. That, of

course, is why he writes a column for Marketing. When Bullmore speaks

the industry listens.



He joined JWT as a copywriter in 1954 and stayed for 33 years, serving

as creative director and then chairman. He is a past president of the

Advertising Association.





76. JUDITH DONOVAN, JUDITH DONOVAN ASSOCIATES



Donovan is arguably the highest profile direct marketer around, having

founded her own agency in 1982.



Her prominence is boosted by her association with the Direct Marketing

Association.



Donovan’s influence goes beyond the marketing world. She was awarded a

CBE last year for being the longest running chairperson of a Training

and Enterprise Council. This year she was appointed a Millennium

Commissioner.





77. MARK SMITH, CADBURY



Australian-born Smith has been in control of Cadbury since taking over

from Alan Palmer in 1998.



He earns status from the power of Cadbury, one of the UK’s

quintessential FMCG brands. Although its spot ad presence is lower than

five years ago, Cadbury’s high profile now rests on its association with

Coronation Street.



Smith came from Mott’s, Cadbury-Schweppes’ US beverage firm, where he

was a vice-president.



Previously, he had been a marketing director with the Schweppes brand in

Australia.



His Aussie charm has proved popular with agencies and staff, but the

jury is still out on his achievements at the giant.





78. GRAHAM DUFF, ZENITH



Zenith Media has been at the number one spot in the UK media agency top

ten, by billings, for at least a decade.



So Graham Duff, its chief executive, is undoubtedly a man fit to hold

one of the biggest jobs in advertising.



He joined the agency in 1993, when, as legend has it, the job offer from

Christine Walker was framed with the promise that she would ’personally

**** his career’ if he didn’t accept.



Duff took on Zenith’s top job in 1997, with the task of filling the

shoes of the more high profile and aggressive Walker.



He has handled a difficult transition with some style, and brought in

Marketing’s former editorial director Simon Marquis as his number

two.



In a way, this is a joint credit.



Zenith had billings of pounds 582m last year and boasts a list of

clients including BT, Pedigree Masterfoods and Lloyds TSB.



Duff, a down-to-earth personality and a good communicator, has seen both

sides of the agency/media owner fence, having worked for Leo Burnett,

Publicis, Meridian Broadcasting and TSMS.





79. TONY ANDERSON, EGG



Anderson got in on the easyJet phenomenon in its early days. Acting as

marketing director during its most vocal battles with British Airways

did his career no harm.



Anderson is earning a reputation for marketing landscape-changing

brands.



This retail marketing director is someone worth listening to.





80. JOHN HOOPER, INCORPORATED SOCIETY OF BRITISH ADVERTISERS



Hooper has been an energetic and passionate defender of marketers’

rights in the face of increased interference from Westminster and

Brussels.



As ISBA director general, his place on this list is also earned by his

profile in the industry. He is to retire shortly.





81. DOUGLAS MCARTHUR RADIO ADVERTISING BUREAU



McArthur is widely credited with turning around the fortunes of

commercial radio, through the RAB, doubling its ad revenue share over

the last five years. A regular networker at numerous marketing social

events.





82. SAMANTHA SMITH, FCA



Smith, 41, is a colourful character and a supreme networker on the

marketing circuit. She has had a wealth of client experience, with

stints at BP, McDonald’s, Burger King and Demon. She switched to the

agency side in 1997, when she joined FCA.



Smith was promoted to managing director in November 1999 and sits on the

executive committee of WACL and is a council member of the IPA.





83. COLIN LLOYD, DIRECT MARKETING ASSOCIATION



With direct marketing under an onslaught from consumers, the UK

government and the European Union, chief executive Lloyd has

co-ordinated the defence team for the industry adeptly. He is

well-respected in the industry for increasing the profile of DM.





84. ADAM NOVAK, ROYAL MAIL



Novak was responsible for encouraging people to write more letters (just

as e-mail was taking hold) with the popular ’Saw this and thought of

you’ campaign.



Moving from consumer to business, his marketing director, media markets,

role involves reminding marketers of the benefits of direct mail.



Press, poster and TV campaigns broke new ground for business-to-business

marketing, usually restricted to newspapers and trade titles.



Novak is a controversial figure in the DM world, as the Royal Mail

diversifies into telemarketing and databases.





85. AJAZ AHMED, AKQA



E-millionaire Ajaz Ahmed founded web site consultancy AKQA after

dropping out of university at the age of 21.



Now a practically decrepit 27, Ahmed is probably the closest thing to a

veteran in the cutting edge new media industry - and his name is still

synonymous with his company. AKQA’s clients are among the biggest

brands, including the likes of BMW, Sainsbury’s, Carlsberg-Tetley and

Orange.



Its founder’s future looks bright, with new media still one of the most

rapidly growing sectors in UK business.



Despite his knowledge of the internet business, perhaps the key to

Ahmed’s success has been his ability to speak the language of marketing,

eschewing techno-babble.



The question is what will he spend all that paper money on: he has

turned down requests of marriage after appearances on the Sunday Times

Rich List and his Muslim faith means he doesn’t drink.



Ahmed cites his parents as his greatest mentors - in fact, apart from

ambition, he almost seems too good to be true ... but what else can you

expect from a man who subscribed to Marketing at the tender age of

14?





86. PETER SIMPSON, FIRST DIRECT



Simpson’s inclusion is largely down to his role as one of the founders

of First Direct. Although the bank is over ten years old, its impact on

the world of financial services marketing was so huge that Simpson, now

commercial director, is still lauded as a guru.





87. ADAM CROZIER, THE FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION



One national press sports editor recently described the appointment of

the former Saatchi & Saatchi chief to the FA’s top job last year as the

most important thing to happen in football in recent years.



Certainly Crozier, 35, has the credentials to bring professional

marketing to the crusty world of the FA.



Crozier was at Saatchis for 12 years before making his transfer. He held

the agency together through the split with Maurice and Charles.



He is trying to bring a new feel to the FA; he doesn’t wear one of the

blue blazers to work and rarely dons a tie these days.



Ultimately, he is the brand manager of the England football team and of

the FA Cup tournament.





88. ERIC SALAMA, WPP



Being director of strategy for the WPP Group should be enough to get

anyone into the Power 100, but Eric Salama makes it on his own

merits.



Salama, 39, is an adviser to the government, sitting on New Labour’s

Task Force for the Creative Industries. He built his reputation as an

ideas man as managing director of WPP’s economic forecasting subsidiary,

The Henley Centre.



Salama joined the parent company of WPP in 1994 and the Board in July

1996. While his boss, Sir Martin Sorrell, is often heralded these days

for his visionary approach to new media, it is Salama who heads WPP.com,

the acquisitive new media division.



Salama may be sharp with ideas, but he’s not so sharp with his

clothes.



He has a reputation as the worst-dressed man in advertising, and once

turned up at a WPP seminar in swimming trunks and flip-flops.





89. MATTHEW FREUD, FREUD COMMUNICATIONS



As with Maurice Saatchi, Freud has now largely ceded managerial control

of his eponymous agency. But that doesn’t mean Freud has lost his

position of power in the marketing world - far from it.



As one half of the only couple in our list (girlfriend Elisabeth

Murdoch’s name and connections give her a similar ranking to Freud), he

wields influence in media and political circles, and in the new media

world with his stake in online retailer ToyZone.



Still recognised as one of the masters of spin, whose involvement can

make all the difference to media coverage, it was his hand behind the

hype of the film Notting Hill, Helen Fielding’s Bridget Jones sequel,

and the Chris Evans/Geri Halliwell saga. Like Trevor Beattie, he emerges

Teflon-like from his association with the Frank Dobson campaign.





90. DAVID WHELDON, CIA MEDIANETWORK



David Wheldon has spent the past ten years in a range of high-profile

roles, from managing director of Lowe Howard-Spink to vice-president of

Coca-Cola’s worldwide advertising.



Never one to shrink from a challenge, Wheldon joined CIA Medianetwork as

chief executive in September last year, charged with turning around the

agency’s fortunes.



CIA is ranked as the tenth biggest UK media agency by its pounds 247m

billings last year.



However, it has experienced difficult times over the past few years,

following its trading dispute with ITV sales house Laser (now known as

Granada Media Sales). It has also lost key accounts, including Lloyds

TSB and Somerfield, and axed staff at the beginning of 1999.



Wheldon has begun to overhaul the business and his no-nonsense, fearless

approach could be the key to unlocking CIA’s future fortunes.





91. ELISABETH MURDOCH, SKY NETWORKS



Glamorous good looks harnessed to the Murdoch name has ensured that

Elisabeth Murdoch is headline news.



As managing director of Sky Networks, BSkyB’s programming arm, she

increased investment in the network’s original programming to its

current level of pounds 90m a year. More generally, Murdoch has

contributed her name, glamour and range of contacts to change negative

perceptions of multi-channel television and of BSkyB in particular.



Murdoch is vice-chairman of the executive committee of the National

Appeal Board for the NSPCC’s Full Stop Campaign and is chairwoman of the

development board for the Royal Court Theatre.



Murdoch’s influence and appeal is unlikely to be diminished by her

recent decision to set up her own independent multimedia production

company.





92. MARTIN JONES, AAR GROUP



As managing director of the AAR, Martin Jones is in the powerful

position of knowing more about client and agency relationships than

anyone else.



An independent adviser to clients reviewing their advertising, Jones is

the man agency chiefs are desperate to impress and whom many a marketing

director turns to first.



Known for his diplomacy and integrity, he has matched some of the UK’s

best known brands and agencies. Jones has run the AAR since 1996. Before

that, he was with J Walter Thompson for 12 years.





93. ANDY LAW, ST LUKE’S



Andy Law is 50% of the team that set up co-operative agency St Luke’s in

1995, to produce ethical ads in a democratic environment.



In 1993, he was managing director of Chiat/Day when the agency informed

him that he would oversee a merger with TBWA.



Repelled by the prospect of being sucked into a giant agency, he and

David Abraham rallied with 35 workers and broke away to create St

Luke’s.



The agency now lists IKEA, Clarks, BSkyB and Boots Beauty among its

clients, and has billings of pounds 130m (MMS).



Law’s achievement is to have created something new in advertising, and

St Luke’s remains the agency most other ad folk like to talk about.





94. ZOE MORGAN, BOOTS THE CHEMIST



Zoe Morgan is the first female marketing director at Boots the Chemist,

one of the UK’s biggest retail brands.



Appointed to the role in January, Morgan, is charged with developing

what Boots sees as a ’differentiation-led strategy’ for the Boots brand,

focusing on developing in-store services such as makeovers, hairdressing

and chiropody.



She controls an ad budget of around pounds 14m, encompassing the main

Boots retail brand, as well as own-brand cosmetics products such as

No7.



Morgan previously spent three years as marketing director for Halfords,

the car and cycle parts retailer owned by Boots.





95. LEIGH BRUCE, BARCLAYS



Leigh Bruce, Barclays’ director of corporate communication, was handed a

big idea to build a big brand.



So he paid big actors, to do a big campaign. But a big round of branch

closures made for a big PR disaster that turned the whole thing into the

biggest marketing blunder of the year.



It would be easy to forgive Bruce his mistake and applaud the attempt to

create a strong brand - if he wasn’t also head of PR. He should probably

have seen it coming.



Barclays Bank spent about pounds 30m on advertising in the past year,

while Barclaycard spent a further pounds 18m, giving the group the

biggest budget in its sector.





96. LARRY BARKER, BMP DDB



Barker, son of TV comedian Ronnie, earns his place on two counts. His

17-year partnership with Rooney Carruthers produced some of the most

memorable ads of recent times, including classic Haagen-Dazs work while

at Bartle Bogle Hegarty, and the Orange launch campaign for WCRS.



But, aside from being creative director at BMP, his industry standing

also rests on his position as this year’s president of the D&AD, which

he is using to raise the issue of getting more women into senior

creative jobs and to boost the profile of the writer’s skills in

advertising.





97. UISDEAN MCLEAN, BROADCAST ADVERTISING CLEARANCE CENTRE



In an era when advertising needs to strike a real chord to stand out,

increasing numbers of TV ads are created with one eye on the controversy

that they will cause.



McLean’s power as director stems from his brief to clear ads before they

are screened.



You can create as shocking an ad as you like, but if McLean feels it’s

not appropriate it won’t be allowed on television. Power indeed.





98. CHRISTOPHER GRAHAM, THE ADVERTISING STANDARDS AUTHORITY



Graham, 49, has a substantial role as ASA director general at a time

when regulation of advertising is high on the agenda.



Reform of the current self-regulatory system is likely if government

comments on introducing pre-vetting of press and poster ads are anything

to go by.



Despite his diplomatic tone - Graham was a BBC administrator before

joining the ASA late last year - he has made noises about ensuring

self-regulation continues to work.



Another issue is the potential of extending the ASA’s remit into

broadcast advertising through merging with, or replacing, the

Independent Television Commission.





99. MT RAINEY, RAINEY KELLY CAMPBELL ROALFE/Y&R



Rainey’s risk in merging her agency with Y&R paid off in April, when she

led the team that scooped one of the most sought-after advertising

accounts of this year - Marks & Spencer.



She is the first female chief executive of a top ten ad agency.





100. JEREMY KING, THE IVY



If your name has not appeared in this list and you have aspirations to

be on the marketing top table, then you should make the acquaintance of

this man.



Jeremy King and his partner Chris Corbin are the founders of restaurants

The Ivy and Le Caprice.



The Ivy is the place to be seen. The ability to get a table for lunch

can be a career maker, or deal breaker.



King and his partner are marketers in their own right, building brands

of excellence in customer service and food.



Agency chiefs have been known to invite them to talk to staff about how

to treat customers. King can still be seen making his rounds at the

restaurants, pressing the flesh of the great and the good.



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Oasis #springasmile digital campaign gets people doing good deeds
Coca-Cola: 'Don't approach bloggers with a fait accompli'
Tesco CMO Matt Atkinson: 'It is so important not to stereotype mothers'
McDonald's gives Ronald a new look ahead of global 'Fun times' social media push
In pictures: BrewDog opens first craft beer shop BottleDog for 'beer aficionados'
Facebook ad revenue leaps $1bn as it invests in targeting
Malteser or Maltesers? Mars takes Hershey trademark dispute to court
Apple Q2 profits top $10bn as iPhone sales soar
Lynx tells men not to leave love to fate
HBO captures awkwardness of watching sex scenes with parents
Primark to open first US stores with Boston chosen as flagship location
Marketing spend on the up but a reality check is needed before celebrating
Top 10 ads of the week: Jackpotjoy and BT Broadband fend off Kevin Bacon
Lidl beats Tesco to 10m Facebook fans
Center Parcs ad banned for encouraging parents to take kids out of school
Coca-Cola, Cadbury and Amazon named top brands for targeting youth market
Leaked document shows Nokia to be rebranded as Microsoft Mobile
Nike lays-off hardware staff in move that casts doubt on future of FuelBand
Greenpeace says save the bees or humans will die
What brands need to know about changes to VAT and online downloads in 2015
Jimmy Savile victims urged to claim compensation in new ad campaign
UKIP launches biggest  ad campaign and stirs up 'racist' accusations
Apple boss Tim Cook provides voiceover on ad touting firm's renewed green commitments
John Lewis walks consumers through its history to celebrate 150 years of business
Waitrose boosts content strategy with 'Weekend Kitchen with Waitrose' C4 tie-up
Hottest virals: Cute puppies star in Pedigree ad, plus Idris Elba and Fruyo
Amnesty International burns candles to illuminate new hope
Tom of Finland's 'homoerotic' drawings made into stamps
Toyota achieves the impossible by calming angry Roman drivers
YouTube reveals user habits to appeal to 'older' marketers