MEDIA: BBC’s Frost defends branding strategy

The BBC’s corporate marketing chief Jane Frost has defended moves to package and market the BBC brand more aggressively as vital to its continued success.

The BBC’s corporate marketing chief Jane Frost has defended moves

to package and market the BBC brand more aggressively as vital to its

continued success.



Speaking at a Chartered Institute of Marketing dinner last week, Frost

said that if the BBC is to continue to fulfil a public-service remit in

the multi-channel age, where viewers have increased control over their

own viewing, it must package itself appropriately for the new delivery

mechanisms.



’The major experience the audience will be with the BBC brand, but maybe

from thousands of different sources not just one or two,’ Frost

said.



This involved marketing the BBC brand rather than focusing soley

individual products or methods of distribution in order to achieve

clarity of identity and to position the BBC as a ’favoured provider of

media experience’.



’From a clear brand proposition, we can deduce the attributes that

define us, work out the relationship that binds our different products

and services and the benefit our audiences gain from our relationship

with us,’ she said.



However, she added that channels such as BBC 1 would still continue to

be important, whether packaged by schedulers or ’self packaged’.



Frost also defended comments by director of television Mark Thompson on

TV strategy, in which he outlined the need for the BBC to move from

mixed-genre channels to channels tailored to specialist subjects, such

as arts and music.



’Just because the BBC is packaged or distributed differently doesn’t

mean its core purpose is diluted,’ she said.



Frost’s comments coincide with a period of intense unease within the

BBC’s marketing and communications departments, as 450 staff wait to

hear the outcome of BBC marketing and communications director Matthew

Bannister’s restructure.



Bannister has said that some job losses would be inevitable. Reports

suggest that up to 60 jobs could go, with staff working in PR functions

likely to be hardest hit.



Insiders suggest that it will be October before the new structure is

confirmed and in place.



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